This time two years ago I was in Athens working on my project on memory and history in the Euro crisis. This time in two weeks the exhibition of the work opens at 12 Star Gallery, London. In the run up to the show opening I’ll be posting some photographs which didn’t make it in to the final project for various reasons.

This photograph shows what soon became frustratingly familiar during my time in Greece. Endless protests, occupations, strikes. In this case the entire metro system shut down for a day. Luckily by this stage I had been walking up to eight hours a day, every day for a month, so the prospect of travelling around Athens by foot wasn’t too bad.

This week on Disphotic, a review of Infidel by Tim Hetherington now open at Photofusion

Untitled, Korengal Valley, Kunar Province, Afghanistan, 2008 © Tim Hetherington, Courtesy Yossi Milo Gallery, New York and Magnum.

“Photography is a vulgar addiction that is gradually taking hold of the whole of humanity, which is not only enamoured of such distortion and perversion but completely sold on them, and will in due course, given the proliferation of photography, take the distorted and perverted world of the photograph to be the only real one. Practitioners of photography are guilty of one of the worst crimes it is possible to commit – of turning nature into a grotesque. The people in their photographs are nothing but pathetic dolls, disfigured beyond recognition, staring in alarm into the pitiless lens, brainless and repellent. Photography is a base passion that has taken hold of every continent and every section of the population, a sickness that afflicts the whole of humanity and is no longer curable. The inventor of the photographic art was the inventor of the most inhumane of all arts. To him we owe the ultimate distortion of nature and the human beings who form part of it, the reduction of human beings to perverse caricatures – his and theirs. I have yet to see a photograph that shows a natural person, a true and genuine person, just as I have yet to see one that gives a true and genuine representation of nature. Photography is the greatest disaster of the twentieth century. Nothing has ever sickened me so much as looking at photographs.”

- Thomas Bernhard, Extinction

via sunilphoto

For the next couple of months I will be IdeasTap’s resident editorial artist, producing an image each week in response to current events. For this project I’ve decided to return to photo montage, a practice I haven’t really used for a couple of years but which used to completely fascinate me. Each week I’m going to post my finished image here, possibly along with some of the out-takes or thoughts on the development of the idea.

In this case the idea for the image comes, I must confess, from someone else, specifically an image by the artist Peter Kennard where a tank rather optimistically transforms into a tractor. My image is a reversal of that, a reference to the dubious aid convoys that Russia has been sending to Ukraine, and which more than a few people suspect might be a cover for arms shipments to pro-Moscow rebels.

Review – Finding Vivian Maier

Finding Vivian Maier From time to time as a writer you feel like you’ve said all you want to say about a particular person or subject.

One night my American friend John Clifford, who owned the best bar in Cambrdige, took me into the middle of Boston to where the civic centre and other administrative buildings now stand. These buildings were built in the 1960s on top of the old tough working class district of Scully Square, where John and his brother were both born and raised.


John pointed out to me streets that no longer existed, telling me who had lived where and in which house. Who had died in Vietnam, who had worked for the mob, who had gone to prison or ended up in politics. When I interrupted his narrative to tell him how great it was that he was telling me the history of this place he spun around, gripped me by the throat and pushed me against the wall. With his raised fist clenched he said, “I don’t know nothing about no fucking history, I am telling you what happened.

— Chris Killip, preface to Arbeit/Work

I’m starting to count down to my first solo show. It’s an exhibition of a series of photographs I made two years ago which look at the role of memory and history in the Euro debt crisis.

The exhibition will be on at Europe House, London from 17th-26th September 2014.

species-of-spaces:

Walter Benjamin at Heringsdorf, c.1896, Walter Benjamin Archiv, Akademie der Künste, Berlin.

species-of-spaces:

Walter Benjamin at Heringsdorf, c.1896, Walter Benjamin Archiv, Akademie der Künste, Berlin.

(via thearcadesproject)

I’ve been so busy lately with writing, photographing for other people, etc that I’ve not had time to progress any of my own photo projects, something which I find incredibly frustrating. I’ve decided to start making some really simple little zines as a solution, just so I can at least feel like I’m producing something creative, this is a dummy of the first. The final thing might not be radically different, the liberation of producing a complete book on a photocopier is amazing. I’ve been so busy lately with writing, photographing for other people, etc that I’ve not had time to progress any of my own photo projects, something which I find incredibly frustrating. I’ve decided to start making some really simple little zines as a solution, just so I can at least feel like I’m producing something creative, this is a dummy of the first. The final thing might not be radically different, the liberation of producing a complete book on a photocopier is amazing. I’ve been so busy lately with writing, photographing for other people, etc that I’ve not had time to progress any of my own photo projects, something which I find incredibly frustrating. I’ve decided to start making some really simple little zines as a solution, just so I can at least feel like I’m producing something creative, this is a dummy of the first. The final thing might not be radically different, the liberation of producing a complete book on a photocopier is amazing.

I’ve been so busy lately with writing, photographing for other people, etc that I’ve not had time to progress any of my own photo projects, something which I find incredibly frustrating.

I’ve decided to start making some really simple little zines as a solution, just so I can at least feel like I’m producing something creative, this is a dummy of the first. The final thing might not be radically different, the liberation of producing a complete book on a photocopier is amazing.

Today on Disphotic, a review of the new exhibition of Dalston Anatomy by Lorenzo Vitturi at The Photographers Gallery.

I honestly believe that photography has never had the opportunity to do such important work, link us all, unify us all, as in the right now.

I don’t like TV, so I don’t own one, I don’t dig narcissism, so I don’t look at that work or swim in those streams.

Art school taught me a lot about the strata of class within art, I avoid it at all costs within photography.

I’m drawn to those that give a fuck, and make work with that as their fuel, and there are many, many editors, curators, bloggers and photographers that do.

The rest, still have not figured out that we all die, all they will leave are vacuous shadows, totems to the self, not much of a legacy, cause/effect.

To have, at our disposal, the internet, mass communication, coupled with the photographic story, such a blessing, such an opportunity, we are very, very lucky.

— (via smalltowninertia)
Top: UnknownBottom: Kennard Phillips Top: UnknownBottom: Kennard Phillips