I’m starting to count down to my first solo show. It’s an exhibition of a series of photographs I made two years ago which look at the role of memory and history in the Euro debt crisis.

The exhibition will be on at Europe House, London from 17th-26th September 2014.

species-of-spaces:

Walter Benjamin at Heringsdorf, c.1896, Walter Benjamin Archiv, Akademie der Künste, Berlin.

species-of-spaces:

Walter Benjamin at Heringsdorf, c.1896, Walter Benjamin Archiv, Akademie der Künste, Berlin.

(via thearcadesproject)

I’ve been so busy lately with writing, photographing for other people, etc that I’ve not had time to progress any of my own photo projects, something which I find incredibly frustrating. I’ve decided to start making some really simple little zines as a solution, just so I can at least feel like I’m producing something creative, this is a dummy of the first. The final thing might not be radically different, the liberation of producing a complete book on a photocopier is amazing. I’ve been so busy lately with writing, photographing for other people, etc that I’ve not had time to progress any of my own photo projects, something which I find incredibly frustrating. I’ve decided to start making some really simple little zines as a solution, just so I can at least feel like I’m producing something creative, this is a dummy of the first. The final thing might not be radically different, the liberation of producing a complete book on a photocopier is amazing. I’ve been so busy lately with writing, photographing for other people, etc that I’ve not had time to progress any of my own photo projects, something which I find incredibly frustrating. I’ve decided to start making some really simple little zines as a solution, just so I can at least feel like I’m producing something creative, this is a dummy of the first. The final thing might not be radically different, the liberation of producing a complete book on a photocopier is amazing.

I’ve been so busy lately with writing, photographing for other people, etc that I’ve not had time to progress any of my own photo projects, something which I find incredibly frustrating.

I’ve decided to start making some really simple little zines as a solution, just so I can at least feel like I’m producing something creative, this is a dummy of the first. The final thing might not be radically different, the liberation of producing a complete book on a photocopier is amazing.

Today on Disphotic, a review of the new exhibition of Dalston Anatomy by Lorenzo Vitturi at The Photographers Gallery.

I honestly believe that photography has never had the opportunity to do such important work, link us all, unify us all, as in the right now.

I don’t like TV, so I don’t own one, I don’t dig narcissism, so I don’t look at that work or swim in those streams.

Art school taught me a lot about the strata of class within art, I avoid it at all costs within photography.

I’m drawn to those that give a fuck, and make work with that as their fuel, and there are many, many editors, curators, bloggers and photographers that do.

The rest, still have not figured out that we all die, all they will leave are vacuous shadows, totems to the self, not much of a legacy, cause/effect.

To have, at our disposal, the internet, mass communication, coupled with the photographic story, such a blessing, such an opportunity, we are very, very lucky.

— (via smalltowninertia)
Top: UnknownBottom: Kennard Phillips Top: UnknownBottom: Kennard Phillips
“The very meaninglessness of life forces man to create his own meaning. Children, of course, begin life with an untarnished sense of wonder, a capacity to experience total joy at something as simple as the greenness of a leaf; but as they grow older, the awareness of death and decay begins to impinge on their consciousness and subtly erode their joie de vivre, their idealism — and their assumption of immortality. As a child matures, he sees death and pain everywhere about him, and begins to lose faith in the ultimate goodness of man. But, if he’s reasonably strong — and lucky — he can emerge from this twilight of the soul into a rebirth of life’s elan. Both because of and in spite of his awareness of the meaninglessness of life, he can forge a fresh sense of purpose and affirmation. He may not recapture the same pure sense of wonder he was born with, but he can shape something far more enduring and sustaining.”
“An art critic who gives Jeff Koons a negative review is like a yelper who gives one star to the Olive Garden. The market has already made up its mind and institutional policy follows. The art critic confronts this consensus and tries to express an independent, individual opinion in spite of it—a thankless task. The art critic doesn’t change the art world’s systems of power; he simply gives them publicity by reminding readers that they exist.”
— From Vernacular Criticism By Brian Droitcour

A review I wrote of Joan Fontcuberta’s great new show at Media Space London, which explores the truth value and manipulative possibilities of photography.

Review – Close and Far: Sergey Prokudin-Gorsky at Calvert 22

Dinner during haying, 1909 Earlier in the week I reviewed a new show of contemporary Russian photography…

“Grundberg also identifies another type of criticism as ‘connoisseurship’, which he rejects as severely limited. The connoisseur, of wine or photographs, asks ‘Is this good or bad?’ and makes a proclamation based on his or her particular taste. This kind of criticism…is extremely limited in scope because the judgements it yields are usually proclaimed without supporting reasons or the benefit of explicit criteria, and thus they are neither very informative nor useful. Statements based on taste are simply too idiosyncratic to be worth disputing.”
— Terry Barrett, Criticizing Photographs

Review – Close and Far: Russian Photography Now at Calvert 22

Village Day, Olya Ivanova It’s far easier to reduce complex subjects to clichés than to attempt to tackle that complexity head on.