“The peculiar advantage of photo-montage lies in the fact that everything which been cut out keeps its familiar photographic appearance. We are still looking first at things and only afterwards at symbols. But because these things have been shifted, because the natural continuities within which they normally exist have been broken, and because they have now been arranged to transmit an unexpected message, we are made conscious of the arbitrariness of their continuous normal message. Their ideological covering or disguise, which fits them so well when they are in their proper place that it becomes indistinguishable from their appearances is abruptly revealed for what it is. Appearances themselves are suddenly showing us how they deceive us”
— John Berger, Political Uses of Photomontage

This time two years ago I was working on my project on memory and history in the Euro crisis. An exhibition of the photographs is now open at 12 Star Gallery, London. Throughout I’ll be posting some photographs which didn’t make it in to the final project for various reasons.

The Karl Marx-Hof was constructed 1927-1930 and is a significant early example of social housing. It quickly developed a reputation for leftism which befitted it’s name. During the 1934 Austrian civil war many residents of the building barricaded themselves inside and came under attack from artillery fire from pro-government conservative forces.

This week on Disphotic I’m marking my exhibition ‘The Memory of History’ by looking back at the ideas behind it:

Synagogue Gate. Budapest, Hungary From The Memory of History Now open at Europe House in London is an exhibition of…

“‘In Heartfields best critical works there is a sense of everything having been soiled … It is disgust at that particular kind of sordidness which exudes from those who now wield political power. This sordidness is not a confirmation of the abstract moral belief that all power corrupts. It is a specific historical and political phenomenon. It could not occur in a theocracy or a secure feudal society. It must await the principle of modern democracy and then the cynical manipulating of that principle. It is endemic in, but by no means exclusive to, latter day bourgeois politics and advanced capitalism. It is nurtured from the gulf between the aims a politician claims and the actions he has in fact already decided upon’”
— John Berger, Political Uses of Photomontage

This time two years ago I was working on my project on memory and history in the Euro crisis. An exhibition of the photographs is now open at 12 Star Gallery, London. Throughout I’ll be posting some photographs which didn’t make it in to the final project for various reasons.

The one euro stores in Vienna appeared to be doing a roaring trade, as the recession had begun to bite even in relatively prosperous states. One of the stranger products I encountered were these Euro note money boxes. I rather regret that I didn’t buy one.

This time two years ago I was working on my project on memory and history in the Euro crisis. An exhibition of the photographs is now open at 12 Star Gallery, London. Throughout I’ll be posting some photographs which didn’t make it in to the final project for various reasons.

The chance aspect of things proved very important in the project, both from the conceptual perspective of trying to uproot the idea of history as an almost pre-ordained sequence of events, but also in the sense that many of my encounters could not have been planned. I arrived in Vienna on the night train, and with a few hours to spend before my hostel I opened I wandered around the city centre. Here I chanced upon a ceremony celebrating the arrival of the German president, an honour guard marched up and down a square to the tune of patriotic music.

This time two years ago I was working on my project on memory and history in the Euro crisis. An exhibition of the photographs is now open at 12 Star Gallery, London. Throughout I’ll be posting some photographs which didn’t make it in to the final project for various reasons.

While in Berlin I visited the former Stasi remand prison in the suburb of Hohenschönhausen. Here opponents of the regime (whether perceived or actual) were incarcerated and interrogated to secure confessions of their crimes against the state. One thing I found strange was that each interrogation room had distinctive patterned wallpaper, almost as if it had been selected by the interrogator who used that room. Though knowing the Stasi’s penchant for psychologically disorientating it’s prisoners this may just have been another detail intended to destabilise them and render a confession.

This time two years ago I was working on my project on memory and history in the Euro crisis. An exhibition of the photographs is now open at 12 Star Gallery, London. Throughout I’ll be posting some photographs which didn’t make it in to the final project for various reasons.

The Detlev-Rohwedder-Haus in Berlin was constructed 1935-36 to house the German ministry of aviation. In the wake of the destruction unleashed on Berlin in the closing years of the war it was one of the few buildings that survived, aided by it’s rugged construction. At the end of the war it was taken over by the Soviet occupying forces and then housed various government ministries during the GDR. Following reunification it housed the committee responsible for privatising East German industries, and now finally houses the finance ministry.

This time two years ago I was working on my project on memory and history in the Euro crisis. An exhibition of the photographs is now open at 12 Star Gallery, London. Throughout I’ll be posting some photographs which didn’t make it in to the final project for various reasons.

This was taken on my way across Germany from Frankfurt, europe’s economic capital, to Berlin. After several weeks of travelling I began to look forward to the train journeys through and between countries as a rare moment of respite. Spending up to eight hours a day out photographing it was good to have time to recharge, read and take stock of the project so far.

This time two years ago I was working on my project on memory and history in the Euro crisis. Tomorrow the exhibition of the work opens at 12 Star Gallery, London. In the run up to the show opening I’ll be posting some photographs which didn’t make it in to the final project for various reasons.

The exhibition finally opens tomorrow, it’s been a long road since I first set out at the start of August 2012. As a jokey tribute to that long road here’s a photo of the sole of one of the shoes I wore while making the project, completely worn out after seven weeks of walking the streets of Europe’s cities.

This time two years ago I was working on my project on memory and history in the Euro crisis. In a few days the exhibition of the work opens at 12 Star Gallery, London. In the run up to the show opening I’ll be posting some photographs which didn’t make it in to the final project for various reasons.

This photograph shows the Poelzig Building in Frankfurt, formerly the IG Farben Building. IG Farben was a vast industrial conglomerate which was central to the German war effort during the Second World War, most notoriously producing Zyklon B, the poison used in the gas chambers of extermination camps. At one point the building was considered as a location for the European Central Bank but in the end became part of the campus of the University of Frankfurt.

This week on Disphotic I’m marking the launch of my exhibition ‘The Memory of History’ by looking back at the crisis

Vandalised Hoarding. Lisbon, Portugal From The Memory of History In two days I will be opening an exhibition of…

This time two years ago I was working on my project on memory and history in the Euro crisis. In a few days the exhibition of the work opens at 12 Star Gallery, London. In the run up to the show opening I’ll be posting some photographs which didn’t make it in to the final project for various reasons.

This shows the new European Central Bank building, which was then under construction on the site of an old fruit and vegetable market (a location which reminded me of Brecht’s Arturo Ui, in which a Hitler-esque gangster corners the fruit and vegetable market of a city). The area surrounding the building site was a rather desolate wasteland of railways tracks and empty lots. Homeless people slept under a neighbouring bridge.

This time two years ago I was working on my project on memory and history in the Euro crisis. This time in one week the exhibition of the work opens at 12 Star Gallery, London. In the run up to the show opening I’ll be posting some photographs which didn’t make it in to the final project for various reasons.

I went to visit the European Parliament building and found a rather impenetrable grey building. As I was leaving I noticed this plaster on the steps of the parliament building, left perhaps by a tourist soothing a blistered foot, but it seemed to me a rather fitting attempt to patch a wounded institution.

This time two years ago I was working on my project on memory and history in the Euro crisis. This time in one week the exhibition of the work opens at 12 Star Gallery, London. In the run up to the show opening I’ll be posting some photographs which didn’t make it in to the final project for various reasons.

Another image from the rather strange ‘Mini-Europe’ theme park. Here a model of the Athenian Acropolis, perhaps the pre-eminent symbol of European democracy, is overshadowed by the multi-coloured flumes of a neighbouring water park.